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cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. he has faced criticism over the handling of the sexual abuse crisis. he has been accused of doing too little to prevent abuse by priests. >> there is a suspicion that they were being shielded by j.p. ii rather than by him. >> he hoped he could build up a struggle church, but in seven years, there was little that he could do. >> for more on what this means, i enjoined by the professor at the catholic university of america. thank you for coming in. were you surprised by this announcement? >> in one sense, yes, because popes do not do this. in another sense, no. pope benedict is a very humble man and realistic man. the job requires energies of mind and body that he no longer has. he has felt free to step down. it is the end of an era, it is the b
viewing homosexuality as a sin. >> it's been said that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
was unequal. we believe in that. religious equality. yes, but don't discriminate against religion. say the conservatives. so what is the other one, applying the bill of rights against the states. >> rose: yeah. >> and conservatives say that means the second amendment and not just the first and the fourth and the fifth. and so although hugely controversial at the time, the warren court actually laid the foundation for the house that you and i and all our audience lives in, is the house that earl warren dreamed up. because here is what the world is in 1953. apartheid, massive mall apportionment in many of the states, organized prayer in the public schools, no broad protection of free speech, practically no right force criminal defendants. and the bill of rights doesn't apply against the states. that's not our world. but that's the world of 1953. and earl warren, hugo black, a textualist as much as scale ya, but from the left. >> rose: a senator from alabama. >> and bill brennan, a northeast judge from-- a democrat, a southern democrat senator and a western progressive republican governor
the relationship between reason and faith and the place of religion in a secular world. i think the truth, judy, is all of of those things have validity. all of them add up to the full picture of a pope who had his strengths and his weaknesses. i think will undoubtedly be remembered for both. >> woodruff: monsignor hilgartner all of that plays into the question of what role will he play in the selection of his successor? he won't have a vote but he selected more than half of the cardinals who will be doing the picking. >> he has selected more than half. there was a question as to whether or not he would participate. and the holy sea clarified this morning in the middle of all the other news that he would not participate. but his influence is clear. i think even his statement this morning about recognizing that there are major things that the church needs to address and do that he doesn't feel that he has the stamina to be able to accomplish really sets the stage for the cardinals when they gather to begin to look at and discuss and reflect on what those issues are. as they then move into the co
is to us. that's partly for from morals, partly from religion, it's also from the law. and these young ones, these kids didn't have their that influence last long enough to draw them into an ordered society. >> rose: so what was the primary influence of the private catholic school you went to. >> to help me choose to be a good person. >> rose: your parents taught you that? >> they didn't tell you, they taught in the a lot by example. and discipline, obviously. i talk a lot about -- >> rose: i'm sure they disciplined you. >> oh, they did, in not always such nice ways. i describe that in the book. but they talk to you about the choice we had as people. to be good or bad people. and they taught about the consequences of that in the afterlife but it seeped into understanding that to choose to be a good person was, a, a choice and, b, one with importance. and to me that's an eternal gift. as you may know, my grammar school is being closed by the archdiocese. >> rose: i do know that. and >> and i am so incredibly heartbroken because my grammar school and almost all on that list are all inner city
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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